Curriculum Plan – English

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Year / Term

Autumn

Spring

Summer

Year 7

 

Language:  Explorations in
creative reading and writing – A Hero’s Adventure

Core Text/s: War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells and other fiction extracts from the adventure genre.

 

Language:  Writer’s
viewpoints and perspectives – Strange Encounters

Core Text/s: Various non-fiction texts including articles, letters and information texts.

Literature:  Modern Text – Abomination, Cirque du Freak, The Black Book of Secrets, The
Foreshadowing, War Horse, Wolf Brother.

 

Literature:  Nineteenth Century text and adaptation – Frankenstein, Great Expectations, Hound of
the Baskervilles, The Invisible Man.

Literature:  Poems Past and Present   School Days Anthology

Year 8

 

Language:  Explorations in creative reading and writing – A Sense of Horror

Core Text/s: Dracula by Bram Stoker and other fiction extracts from the gothic genre.

Language:  Writer’s viewpoints and perspectives – The Gender Debate

Core Text/s: Various non-fiction texts including speeches, diaries and persuasion texts.

Literature:  Modern Text – Curious Incident of a Dog in a Night-time, Northern Lights, Of Mice and Men, Prince of Mist, Stone Cold.

Literature:  Poems Past and Present – Love and Relationships Anthology (Family).

 

Literature:  Shakespeare – Comedies and Histories (non GCSE text).

Year 9

 

Language:  Explorations in creative reading and writing – Fantasy Worlds

Core Text/s: A Storm of Swords by George R. R. Martin and other fiction extracts from the fantasy genre.

Language:  Writer’s viewpoints and perspectives – Time to Talk About It

Core Text/s: Various non-fiction texts including letters, articles and recount texts.

Literature:  19th Century Novel – AQA GCSE text (The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, A Christmas Carol, Great Expectations, Jane Eyre).

Literature:  Poems Past and Present – Power and Conflict
Anthology.

 

Literature:  Modern Text – AQA GCSE text (An Inspector Calls, Blood Brothers, DNA, Lord of the Flies, Animal Farm).

Year 10

Language:  Explorations in creative reading and writing – Mystery and Intrigue

Core Text/s: The Bourne Identity by Robert Ludlum and other fiction extracts from the mystery genre.

 

Language:  Writer’s viewpoints and perspectives – Dangerous Environments

Core Text/s: Various non-fiction texts including articles, autobiographical and explanation texts.

Language:  Spoken Language
Endorsement

Literature:  Shakespeare – AQA GCSE text (Macbeth, Merchant of Venice, Julius Caesar, Romeo and Juliet)

Literature:  Poems Past and Present – AQA Anthology

 

Literature:  Modern Text – AQA GCSE text (An Inspector Calls, Blood Brothers, DNA, Lord of the Flies, Animal Farm).

Year 11

Language:  Explorations in
creative reading and writing – Dystopian Futures

Core Text/s: Scarlet Plague by Jack London and other fiction extracts from the science fiction genre.

Language:  Writer’s viewpoints and perspectives – The Generation Gap

Core Text/s: Various non-fiction texts including essays, articles and argument texts.

Language:  Tailored revision

 

Literature:  Shakespeare – AQA GCSE text (Macbeth, Merchant of Venice, Julius Caesar, Romeo and Juliet)

Literature:  Poems Past and Present – AQA Anthology

Literature:  Tailored revision

 

Additional Information for Year 9, 10 & 11 Students – GCSE Courses

English

Exam Board

Course
Code & Web Link

Suggested Resources

Exam Year 2018

AQA

601/4292/3 (Language) http://www.aqa.org.uk

601/4447/6 (Literature) http://www.aqa.org.uk

English Language Course Specification (PDF)

English Literature Course Specification (PDF)

Hints & Tips

Exam Year 2019

AQA

601/4292/3 (Language) http://www.aqa.org.uk

601/4447/6 (Literature) http://www.aqa.org.uk

English Language Course Specification (PDF)

English Literature Course Specification (PDF)

Hints & Tips

Your teacher will have taught you specific methods to use when answering each question. If these work for you, stick to them – it’s tempting to have a last minute panic when you look on revision websites and see different ways of doing things, but try to avoid this. English Language and Literature are very open subjects and there are many ways of tackling the same task. Know how you work well, and practise this.

Practise, practise, practise! Your teacher will give you as many additional tasks as you’d like, and the focus should be whatever has been highlighted on your PLC. Focus on improving areas of weakness, rather than working relentlessly with no particular focus.

Read. You may not love it… you may not even like it, but try to set yourself a challenge of reading every day. Treat your reading ability as a muscle; it will only get stronger if you exercise it regularly. When you have a set text, you simply have to re-read it. You may find it useful to listen to an audiobook or read with a parent, relative or friend. Some students find it helpful to answer questions as they read because they read more actively.

Give yourself a focus. If you don’t enjoy reading, make yourself play “Who Why What Where When” – read a non-fiction text each day and ask yourself these questions. It will sharpen your ability to identify information within a text.

Get used to highlighting effectively, whether in class or at home. Many students highlight without really knowing what they are looking for, so they end up with a full page of neon but are no closer to being able to answer the questions! Look for key words in the question, predict what the answers might look like, then read and highlight as you go.

Know your numbers. Try to avoid aiming for a grade, and instead make sure you know exactly how many marks you need, then work backwards. Keep talking to your teacher about where you are, and how you can improve. It really is a numbers game, and every mark matters.

Spelling, punctuation and grammar are more heavily weighted than ever now, so spend time learning key words. You are only going to learn spellings off by heart by rehearsing them and testing yourself, so put the time in now!

Timing is crucial, even when completing practice questions. You will be given very specific guidelines by your teacher on how many minutes to use per question, and you must stick to these, however challenging they feel. The minutes have been decided by the marks on offer, so don’t waste minutes that you will need later on.

There will be areas where you are stronger as well as those where you are weaker. Spend as much time developing and building your strengths as you do addressing your weaknesses. It will build your confidence, and you may find it gains you more marks in the long term than if you’d only focused on your weak points.

Trust your teacher! You may not always like what we have to say, but we have all been through GCSEs many times with many students. Many teachers are also GCSE and A Level examiners too. If you work reasonably hard over the course of the year and do what your teacher suggests, you will almost certainly achieve your target grade. Every teacher in the school wants you to do well, and everything we do is fuelled by this. We will push you to do well, but we will also give you all of the support you need to achieve your goals.

Exam Year 2020

AQA

601/4292/3 (Language) http://www.aqa.org.uk

601/4447/6 (Literature) http://www.aqa.org.uk

English Language Course Specification (PDF)

English Literature Course Specification (PDF)

Hints & Tips

Your teacher will have taught you specific mthods to use when answering each question. If these work for you, stick to them – it’s tempting to have a last minute panic when you look on revision websites and see different ways of doing things, but try to avoid this. English  Language and Literature are very open subjects and there are many ways of tackling the same task. Know how you work well, and practise this.

Practise, practise, practise! Your teacher will give you as many additional tasks as you’d like, and the focus should be whatever has been highlighted on your PLC. Focus on improving areas of weakness, rather than working relentlessly with no particular focus.

Read. You may not love it… you may not even like it, but try to set yourself a challenge of reading every day. Treat your reading ability as a muscle; it will only get stronger if you exercise it regularly. When you have a set text, you simply have to re-read it. You may find it useful to listen to an audiobook or read with a parent, relative or friend. Some students find it helpful to answer questions as they read because they read more actively.

Give yourself a focus. If you don’t enjoy reading, make yourself play “Who Why What Where When” – read a non-fiction text each day and ask yourself these questions. It will sharpen your ability to identify information within a text.

Get used to highlighting effectively, whether in class or at home. Many students highlight without really knowing what they are looking for, so they end up with a full page of neon but are no closer to being able to answer the questions! Look for key words in the question, predict what the answers might look like, then read and highlight as you go.

Know your numbers. Try to avoid aiming for a grade, and instead make sure you know exactly how many marks you need, then work backwards. Keep talking to your teacher about where you are, and how you can improve. It really is a numbers game, and every mark matters.

Spelling, punctuation and grammar are more heavily weighted than ever now, so spend time learning key words. You are only going to learn spellings off by heart by rehearsing them and testing yourself, so put the time in now!

Timing is crucial, even when completing practice questions. You will be given very specific guidelines by your teacher on how many minutes to use per question, and you must stick to these, however challenging they feel. The minutes have been decided by the marks on offer, so don’t waste minutes that you will need later on.

There will be areas where you are stronger as well as those where you are weaker. Spend as much time developing and building your strengths as you do addressing your weaknesses. It will build your confidence, and you may find it gains you more marks in the long term than if you’d only focused on your weak points.

Trust your teacher! You may not always like what we have to say, but we have all been through GCSEs many times with many students. Many teachers are also GCSE and A Level examiners too. If you work reasonably hard over the course of the year and do what your teacher suggests, you will almost certainly achieve your target grade. Every teacher in the school wants you to do well, and everything we do is fuelled by this. We will push you to do well, but we will also give you all of the support you need to achieve your goals.